Sunday, March 16, 2014

Silk Indulgence Crazy Patch, Extravagence vs Necessity

Throughout my research into Crazy Patchwork, i have found that In the Victorian Era, the crazy patchwork quilts were a show piece, piece of art work, more than a functional item and were used to decorate the parlor. It is said that they were made using velvet, silk and brocade fabric, cut and pieced in random shapes. Ladies of leisure spent their time extravagantly embroidering and embellishing the patched pieces of silk and velvet in jeweled colours.
I have discovered that The Victorians were fond of symbolism and included motifs on their crazy patchwork quilts which had special significance to the stitcher or the receiver. Flowers were used for a message of love.  The spider web, is often featured on many quilts because it symbolizes good luck.  Special events including names, dates and verses were worked onto the crazy patchwork quilts. Scraps of special fabric, eg. from a wedding dress would be included in some manner.  Silk thread, was a favourite and the most common stitches used were feather, herringbone, fly and chain.

Interestingly not all crazy patchwork quilts were made to be a piece of art.Throughout the early 1800, In North America, the times were hard and many struggled. The colonial women made crazy patchwork quilts, which were a functional necessity to keep warm and were made using old pieces of clothing and blankets and no embellishments.
Click  here to read more about the early crazy patchwork quilts. In particular the 2nd paragraph highlights the use of recycling fabric and old clothes to make their quilts of functionality.
  
My crazy patchwork is inspired by the Victorian Era, a work of pure silk indulgence. It is more of a show piece, made with dupion silk, embellished with silk thread and ribbon, and adorned with antique lace, tiny charms and beads.
Silk Indulgence Crazy Patch in progress
 

4 comments:

  1. We must be living in parallel lives! I have just been researching the very same subject because I have to give a trunk show on Wednesday and thought it would be nice to have a bit of the history of the art to pass on at the meeting.

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    1. I do love researching the history, both Victorian Era and the functional necessity type. Hope what you present on Wednesday goes well.

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  2. I honestly cannot tell you how beautiful this is...
    http://karenannruane.typepad.com/karen_ruane/

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